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Prevention

eBanking Security

Learn How To Protect Yourself Online fraud occurs when someone poses as a legitimate source (like your bank, favorite shopping site or internet service provider) in order to obtain your personal information. This information is then used to conduct transactions on existing accounts. Methods used by fraudsters to commit online fraud are typically fake emails, pop-up messages and/or web sites. Your Relationship With First Bank First Bank will never ask you to provide, verify or update your personal information by sending an email, a text or using a pop-up message or link. If you receive such a message that appears to be from First Bank requesting you to provide or validate personal information, DO NOT RESPOND. First Bank representatives may call you regarding activity on your account or you may be contacted through our automated systems to verify transaction activity on your account(s), such as debit card or eBanking activity. For your protection, we may ask you to verify your zip code and transaction a ...

Imposter Fraud

Existing Relationships Exploited by Hackers Imposter fraud occurs when someone acts as if they work for a company that you know and trust such as a utility, bank, or insurance company. The hacker uses the current relationship between you and the company to request a payment or inform you that a change will be made to your traditional payment arrangement. Providing information to the hacker allows them to redirect these payments. The payments look normal to the bank because they are being made by authorized users. Typically, this type of fraud is not quickly identified, making it harder to recover funds, particularly those sent electronically. Best Practices to Avoid Imposter Fraud •Require verification on all requests for payments made outside normal channels or changes to vendor remittance information. •Cross-verify. If the request came by mail or email, verify it with a phone call. If the request came by phone, verify it by email. •Always use the contact information that you have ...

Identity Theft

Learn How to Protect Yourself Identity theft occurs when someone illegally obtains your personal information. This often includes your full name, birthdate, financial account numbers, social security number (SSN), or any other pertinent details cybercriminals can use to falsely obtain various types of credit in your name. This information is then used by the thief to: •Open new accounts, such as bank, credit cards, or loans, using the acquired information. •Conduct unauthorized transactions on an account or attempt to empty an existing account. •Common tactics used by criminals to obtain the personal details they need are by stealing purses or wallets, intercepting or redirecting mail, or going through the garbage. It can also be obtained if you communicate, shop, or do business online. Protecting Yourself •Safeguard your personal information. Only share it when you’ve made the initial contact, knowing how, where, and why it will be used. •Do not give out your Driver ...

Telephone & Mail Fraud

Ensuring Your Safety Telephone Fraud First Bank representatives may call you regarding activity on your account or you may be contacted through our automated systems to verify transaction activity on your account(s), such as debit card or eBanking activity. For your protection, we may ask you to verify your zip code and transaction activity. Telephone Fraud Tips •Protect your personal information, account numbers, User ID & password, card numbers and PINs •Use caution when providing this information to persons/entities over the phone •Never give your debit or credit card numbers over the phone or Internet unless you have a trusted relationship with the person or company or you have initiated contact Mail Fraud When someone takes your mail illegally, it’s considered mail theft. The intent of mail thieves is to obtain private information, including bank account numbers, credit card details, and, of course, your Social Security Number. This information can then be used to f ...

Credit & Debit Card Fraud

Ensuring Credit and Debit Card Safety Card fraud can occur in a variety of ways from unauthorized use, skimming or card data compromises. First Bank continuously trends your account activity and looks for suspicious transactions that might fall outside of your normal spending patterns. If we find something suspicious, we will temporarily restrict your card and make attempts to contact you. Once we are able to validate the legitimacy of your transaction, we will reinstate your card. If your card is lost or stolen, contact us immediately using one of the following telephone numbers: •For First Bank ATM/Debit Cards, call 800-760-2265 •For First Bank Credit Cards, call 888-295-5540 (for consumer credit cards) or 1-800-819-4249 (for business credit cards) Skimming Skimming is a method by which thieves capture the data in the magnetic strip from your card and use it to create a new, counterfeit card. The counterfeit cards are then used to process unauthorized transactions against your accoun ...

7 Tips to Help Prevent Tax ID Fraud

As Americans begin the process of filing tax returns, identity thieves are scheming to get their hands on that money. Tax identity theft has been one of the most common forms of identity theft reported to the Federal Trade Commission in recent years. We’d like to help raise consumer awareness and provide tips to help prevent tax ID fraud. Identity thieves look for every opportunity to steal your information, especially during tax season. Consumers should be on high alert and take every step they can to protect their personal and financial information. Tax identity fraud takes place when a criminal files a false tax return using a stolen Social Security number in order to fraudulently claim the refund. Identity thieves generally file false claims early in the year and victims are unaware until they file a return and learn one has already been filed in their name. To help prevent tax ID fraud, consider the following tips: • File early. File your tax return as soon as you’re able, gi ...

Be Alert — Many IRS Scams are Targeting Taxpayers

As April 15 approaches, many taxpayer scams are already surfacing in a fraudulent attempt to gain access to private data. We wanted to share a few helpful tips from Scott Pogue, First Bank’s Information Security Manager, to help keep you—and your information—safe. Although vigilance is required from each of us all year, it’s especially important during tax filing season, keep the following in mind: • File your return early or as soon as you are able to do so. It helps to decrease the time an online criminal has to illegally file using your data. • Don’t fall for malicious fear tactics. The IRS will never reach out to individual filers via e-mail so, if you see this, simply delete it. The IRS will not warn you of an audit via e-mail, nor will a third-party step in on your behalf without warning. • Before filing online, do your homework. Research the reputation of the online company you’re going to file through and never click on an e-mail from ...

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